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Ryan the lion
Ryan the lion
4 months ago

https://www.bitchute.com/video/NzW6FoAgMqNP/. James. Life is funny, I actually started from the beginning of your videos once and tirelessly watched through just about all of them, I’ve learned some great stuff, discovered new people like Jerry Marzinsky, and Freeman tv. This put the pieces of the ones from your very beginning vides together! What’s funny is I only started from the oldest videos with one other channel. Check this shit out! Maybe you already know.

Kameron
Kameron
4 months ago

I am going to jam a couple fifty-cent words together to address the quandary Elliot and the rest of us negotiate with, as we face and digest the world: pointillistic temporality.
 
This tandem of terms reminds me of what James True speaks to, when he explores the self-augmented reality.

I have committed most of my recent thought toward parsing differences between the language of the flesh and the intellect of the mind. This is what colors my thinking, today.

Keen senses reckon in sounds, scents, tastes, and other forgotten notations which we have dropped. I imagine that full presence, in the wisdom of the body, makes for many books in the counting-house of the brain. Conversely, I relate the technological progress made by mankind — from the printing press to the touch-screen — as an achievement that flexes the mind into clarity and walks us away from the world known through the body.  

I see this gender-identity matter as an expression of onerous longing for the verity we once knew through the body, coupled with the cost of our addiction. We have achieved new heights of cerebral stimulation, while having the majority our sensory experience ‘pinhead’ upon the intellect. We have effectively isolated a state of comfort, out of the world. Likewise, we engage in some grotesque forms of self-mutilation, as we grasp for a way back in. 

Back to ‘pointillistic temporality’ and the difficulty of growing out of — and into — the self-augmented reality.  

I don’t want to be trite by trafficking in Stoicism. Furthermore, I love the utility of imagination.  

That said, the pen name Marcus Aurelius offers a healthy injunction for himself and every other individual seeking to thrive, amidst a society phasing through a state of putrefaction. I find that it strengthens my resolve, as I face the whims of consensus.

“Wipeout your imagination. Always abide by first appearances. Say your child is ill; that’s a simple fact; you now see it. But that the child is in danger, that’s an interpretation; you don’t see it. So don’t be perturbed by an imagined future.”

Present: Meditations VI 32, VIII 98; imagination: VI 17, 29, VIII 29